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Full text of "Annual catalogue of Lincoln University"

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CATALOGUE 



OF 



IiiRQelm HaiveiflSifeY, 



CHESTER COUNTY 



PENNSYLVANIA 



FOR THE 



Academical Year, 1885-86 



PHILADELPHIA: 

THE JAS. B. RODGERS PRINTING COMPANY, 

52 and 54 North Sixth St. 
1886. 



thirtieth icademical fear. 



Theological Commencement,. Wednesday, April 21, 1886. 

Collegiate Commencement, Tuesday, June 1, 1886. 



thirty-first Icademical leap. 



Opening Collegiate Department, Sept. 16, 1886. 

Opening Theological Department, Sept. 16, 1886. 

Close of First Session, Dec. 23, 1886. 

Opening of Second Session, Jan. 6, 1887. 



Trustees of £ineoln Uniuersifjf. 



GEORGE E. DODGE, Esq., New York City, N. Y. 

REV. ANDREW B. CROSS, Baltimore, Md. 

ALEXANDER WHILLDIN, Esq., Philadelphia, Pa. 

JOHN M. C. DICKEY, Esq., Oxford, Pa. 

REV. WILLIAM R. BINGHAM, D. D., Oxford, Pa. 

REV. CHARLES A. DICKEY, D. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

REV. NATHAN G. PARKE, Pittston, Pa. 

GEN. JAMES A. BEAVER, Bellefonte, Pa. 

REV. THOMAS McCAULEY, Chester, Pa. 

REV. HENRY E. NILES, D. D., York, Pa. 

'REV. GEORGE S. MOTT, D. D Flemington, N. J. 

REV. STEPHEN W. DANA, D. D., ■ . Philadelphia, Pa. 

REV. ISAAC N. RENDALL, D. D., Lincoln University, Pa. 

REV. ELLIOTT E. SWIFT, D.D., Allegheny, Pa. 

REV. CALVIN W. STEWART, D. D., Coleraine, Pa. 

HON. JOSEPH ALLISON, LL.D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

ADAM C. ECKFELDT, Esq., Chester, Pa. 

REV. HENRY H. WELLES, Kingston, Pa. 

REV. JAMES T. LEFTWICH, D. D., Baltimore, Md. 

REUBEN J. FLICK, Esq., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

CHARLES E. VAIL, Esq., Blairstown, N. J. 



Qfficers of the JJoard. 

PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD, 

REV. WILLIAM R. BINGHAM, D. D., Oxford, Pa. 

TREASURER OF THE BOARD, 

J. EVERTON RAMSEY, Esq., Oxford, Pa, 

SECRETARY OF THE BOARD, 

REV. CALVIN W. STEWART, D.D., Coleraine, Pa. 



REV. EDWARD WEBB, Oxford, Pa. 

AGENT, 

REV. J. CHESTER, Cincinnati, 0. 



Committees, 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 

REV. WILLIAM R. BINGHAM, D. D., Oxford, Pa. 

ALEXANDER WHILLDIN, Esq., Philadelphia, Pa. 

REV. CALVIN W. STEWART, D.D., Coleraine, Pa. 

REV. ISAAC N. RENDALL, D. D., Lincoln University, Pa. 



COMMITTEE ON COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT. 

REV. THOMAS McCAULEY, Chester, Pa. 

REV. NATHAN G. PARKE, Pittston, Pa. 

REV. HENRY H. WELLES, Kingston, Pa. 

REV. GEORGE S. MOTT, D. D., Flemington, N. J. 

/ 

COMMITTEE ON THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

REV. CALVIN W. STEWART, D. D., Coleraine, Pa. 

ALEXANDER WHILLDIN, Esq., Philadelphia, Pa. 

REV. STEPHEN W. DANA, D. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 



INVESTING COMMITTEE. 

ALEXANDER WHILLDIN, Esq., Philadelphia, Pa. 

REV. WILLIAM R. BINGHAM, D. D., Oxford, Pa. 

REV. ISAAC N. RENDALL, D. D., Lincoln University, Pa. 

CHARLES E. VAIL, Esq., Blairstown, N. J. 



0ffieers of Instruction and Government, 



Rev. ISAAC N. RENDALL, D. D., 

President of Lincoln University. 



Rev. GILBERT T. WOODHULL., D. D., 

Charles Avery Professor of Classical and Hellenistic Greek and New Testament Literature. 



John H Cassidy Professor of Latin and Principal of the Preparatory Department. 



Rev. THOMAS W. CATTELL, Ph. D., 

Reuben J. Flick Professor of Mathematics, Professor of Sacred Geography and Biblical 
Antiquities, and Librarian. 



Rev. BENJAMIN T. JONES, 

Professor of Instruction in English Versions of the Bible. 

Rev. E. T. JEFFERS, D. D., 

Baldwin Professor of Theology and Treasurer of the Faculty. 

Rev. DAVID E. SHAW, A. M., 

Professor of Hebrew and Church History. 

Rev. SAMUEL A. MARTIN, A. M., 

Wm. E. Dodge Professor of Rhetoric. 

CHARLES F. WOODHULL, A. M., 

Instructor in Natural Science. 

MOSES H. JACKSON, A. B., 

Instructor in Rhetoric. 



General Information. 



Every applicant for admission must present evidence of good moral 
character; and if from any other institution, a certificate of honorable 
dismission from the proper authorities. 

All students in the University are required to attend daily prayers, 
religious services on the Lord's day, and such exercises of instruction 
and recitation as may be assigned to them. 

Students regularly advanced with their classes in the courses of 
study are required to return promptly to the University at the opening 
of the session. 

The expenses of a student in Lincoln University need not exceed 
$150 a year. An exact estimate of the personal expenses of a student, 
above what is included in the session bills, cannot be made. 

Many benevolent friends of education are co-operating with the 
Trustees and Faculty in providing aid for those who need it. Careful 
discrimination is exercised in directing this aid to individuals, so as not 
to weaken the sense of personal responsibility and self-reliance. Those 
who can pay their own bills have only to comply w T ith the regulations 
for admission, and they will be admitted to the standing in the classes 
for which their previous training has fitted them ; but no earnest young 
man of good abilities and good moral character should be discouraged 
from seeking the advantages which are here offered. All who need aid 
should apply for admission to the President, or to some member of the 
Faculty, and state in their application their purpose in seeking an 
education, what progress they have made in study, and what part of 
the expenses they can meet. 

The students board in clubs, or in boarding-houses adjacent to the 
University. The cost of board cannot be fixed at an unvarying rate 
from year to year. During the current year board and washing have 
been furnished for nine dollars per month. 

Devotional exercises, consisting of reading the Scriptures, singing 
and prayer, are held with the students in the chapel every day. 

A voluntary prayer-meeting is held by the students every evening 
except Friday. 

The Library contains about nine thousand volumes, and about four 
thousand magazines and miscellaneous pamphlets. 

Since the last catalogue was published ninety-eight volumes have 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



been added by purchase, and nine hundred and thirty-nine volumes by 
the generous liberality of friends, viz : 

VOLUMES. 

From Mrs. H. A. Kerr, one set Henry's Commentary, 6 

" Mrs. Theodore Cuyler, one set Rees' Cyclopaedia, 46 vols., &c., ... 51 

u Rev. R. D. Harper, D.D., 383 

" Mrs. S. M. Dickson, 84 

" Rev. Samuel Whaley, 78 magazines, &c, 40 

" Mr. Walter L. Diver, 284 

" several others (some unknown), 91 

939 
The Reading-room, which is open every day (except Sunday) is 
supplied with a number of daily and weekly papers, and monthly and 
quarterly reviews. 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS. 

Collegiate Department — Classical Course, 118 

English Course, 17 

Preparatory Department, 23 

Theological Department, 31 



Total, 



189 



RESIDENCE. 



North Carolina, 58 

Maryland, 28 

Pennsylvania, 23 

Virginia, 17 

South Carolina, 9 

Delaware, 7 

Missouri, 7 

New Jersey, 7 

Georgia, 6 

Florida, 3 

Liberia, 3 

New York, 3 

District of Columbia, ... 2 

Indian Territory, 2 



Tennessee, . . 

Arkansas, . . 

Indiana, . . 

Kentucky, . 
Massachusetts, 

Mississippi. . 

Texas, . . . 

Bahama, . . 

Bermuda, . . 
Cuba, .... 

Hayti, . . . 

Jamaica, . . 

Ontario, . . . 



189 



Southern States, 
Northern States, 
Foreign States, . 



145 

35 

9 



189 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



RELIGIOUS PROFESSION. 



Presbyterian, 98 

Methodist, 47 

Baptist, 20 

Episcopalian, 5 



Campbellite, 1 

Not professors, 18 



Total, 



189 



CANDIDATES FOR THE MINISTRY. 

Senior Class, 19 

78 

Theological Department, . 31 



English Course, . 
Preparatory Class, 
Freshman " 
Sophomore " 
Junior " 



15 
9 
14 
11 
10 



Total, 



110 



CALENDAR. 

The Academical year is divided into two sessions, 
one week is taken in the second session. 



A recess of 



Kecess in Current Year, April 8 to 15, 1886 

Annual Sermon to the Theological Students, . . . April 18, 1886 
Commencement in Theological Department, .... April 21, 1886 

Anniversary of Philosophian Society, April 22, 1886 

Senior Final Examination, April 29 to May 3, 1886 

Class Day, May 6, 1886 

Meeting of Presbytery of Chester, May 13, 1886 

Anniversary Garnet Literary Association, May 21, 1886 

Junior Contest, May 31, 1886 

Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees, May 31, 1886 

Commencement in the Collegiate Department, .... June 1, 1886 



SUMMER VACATION. 
TWENTY-NINTH ACADEMICAL YEAR. 

First Session Collegiate Department, September 16, 1886. 

First Session Theological Department, September 16, 1886. 

Close of First Session, December 23, 1886. 



WINTER VACATION. 

Opening of Second Session in all departments, . . . January 6, 1887, 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



Gollegiate Department, 



FACULTY OF ARTS. 

Rev. ISAAC N. RENDALL, D. D., President, 
Rev. GILBERT T. WOODHULL, D. D., 

Avery Professor of Greek. 

Rev. JOHN B. RENDALL, A. M., 

Cassidy Professor of Latin. 

Rev. THOMAS W. CATTELL, Ph.D., 

Flick Professor of Mathematics. 



Professor of Biblical Instruction. 

Rev. E. T. JEFFERS, D. D., 

Psychology. 

Rev. DAVID E. SHAW, A. M., 

Professor of History. 

Rev. SAMUEL A. MARTIN, A. M., 

William E. Dodge Professor of Rhetoric. 

CHARLES F. WOODHULL, A. M., 

Instructor in Natural Science. 

MOSES H. JACKSON, A.B., 

Instructor in Rhetoric. 



10 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



Students. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Thomas H. Amos, Lincoln University, Pa. 

Harry W. Bass, West Chester, Pa. 

Albert L. Blueford, Yorktown, Va. 

Willis Bryant, Indianapolis, Ind. 

John A. Caldwell, ... Greensboro, N. C. 

William T. Carr, Jr., Elizabeth, N. J. 

Richard Conwell, Milford, Del. 

Harry S. Cummings, Baltimore, Md. 

Arthur B. Davis, Greensboro, N. C. 

Charles J. Durham, Trenton, N. J. 

Armistead J. Gray, Chula, Va. 

William C. Greene, Beaufort, S. C. 

George C. Hall, Fulton, Mo. 

William G. Hepburn, West Chester, Pa. 

Daniel G. Hill, Baltimore, Md. 

Francis M. Hines, Toisnot, N. C. 

Lucius J. Holley, Greensboro, N. C. 

David J. Hull, Chester, Pa. 

Wiley B. Hunter, Raleigh, N. C. 

Benjamin C. Jones, Lincoln University, Pa. 

Fletcher R. McLean, Greensboro, N. C. 

Leroy J. Montague, New York City, N. Y. 

Thomas C. Ogburn, Greensboro, N. C. 

William G. Ogburn, Greensboro, N. C. 

Butler H. Peterson, Jacksonville, Fla. 

James B. Raymond, West Chester, Pa. 

Irving W. L. Roundtree, Live Oak, Fla. 

George C. Shaw, Louisburg, N. C. 

William H. Shaw, Louisburg, N. C. 

Jerry M. Summerville, Danville, Va. 

Albert L. Sumner, Salisbury, N. C. 

Squier Sykes, Columbia, S. C. 

John M. Waldron, Richmond, Va. 

George H. Willis, New Berne, N. C. 

ENGLISH COURSE. 

Edward W. Frisby, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Joshua Given, Kioway and Camanche, Ind. Ter. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



11 



Amos A. Henderson, Cedar Hill, Md. 

John H. Howard, York, Pa. 

Elwood G. Hubert, Wilmington, Del. 

Isaac Jarvis, • Lincoln University, Pa. 

George F. Johns, Monrovia, Liberia. 

Almarine E. V. McKellop, Muscogee, Ind. Ter. 

John B. Mancebo, Santiago, Cuba. 

Jacob C. Moultrie, Beaufort, S. C. 

Julian Nelson, Port Royal, Va. 

Morris Riley, New York City, N. Y. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

James R. Barrett, Danville, Va. 

Henry R. Butler, Wilmington, N. C. 

Thomas D. N. Campbell, . Monrovia, Liberia. 

William Chew, Darlington, Md. 

James A. Chiles, Richmond, Va. 

William W. Cooper, Salem, N. J. 

James S. Hall, Chatham, Ontario. 

Willis G. Hare, Raleigh, N. C. 

William E. Harris, Baltimore, Md. 

Chas. A. Harrison, Lynchburg, Va. 

Chas. S. Hedges, Baltimore, Md. 

Charles L. Jefferson, Fulton, Mo. 

Charles W Johnson, Baltimore, Md. 

William A. B. Kerr, Cape, Hayti. 

Stepney T. Langhorne, • Philadelphia, Pa. 

Abraham L. Presbury, Havre de Grace, Md. 

John K. Rector, Little Rock, Ark. 

Isaiah R. Reed. Beaufort, S. C. 

Thos. H. Slater, Salisbury, N. C. 

James H. Smith, Baltimore, Md. 

James L. Smith, Cape May C. H., N. J. 

Sandy *W. Stevens, Fayetteville, N. C. 

John W. Tildon, Michaelsville, Md. 

Richard E. Toomey, ■ Baltimore, Md. 

Peyton R. Twine, Richmond, Va. 

Coydan H. Uggams, Augusta, Ga. 

William A. Wallace, Oxford, Pa. 

Calvin S. Whitted, Mebanesville, N. C. 

Thomas T. Womack, Farmsville, Va. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

William A. Albouy, St. George's, Bermuda. 

William H. Biddle, • New Berne, N. C. 

Alexander Bright, Keyser, N. C. 



12 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



William J. Broughton, Augusta, Ga. 

Arthur M. Brown, Raleigh, N. C. 

Jacob T. Brown, Hilton Head, S. C. 

Isaac D. Burrell, . . . . Chula, Va. 

Wesley F. Cotton, Still Point, Md. 

Austin M. Curtis, Raleigh, N. C. 

Franklin A. Dennison, San Antonio, Tex. 

John L. Dozier, Baltimore, Md. 

Henry F. Gamble, Charlottesville, Va. 

Melford H. Hagler, Franklinton, N. C. 

John B. Henry, • Pocomoke City, Md. 

John S. Jarvis, Booneville, N. C. 

William M. Jones, Pittsburg, Pa. 

George L. Lane, Raleigh, N. C. 

John B. Morehead, Charlotte, N. C. 

Samuel J. Onque, Princeton, N. J. 

John S. Outlaw, Windsor, N. C. 

Mungo Pouton, Wilmington, N. C. 

David W. Postles, Dover, Del. 

Jonh W. Prather, Booneville, N. C. 

Theodore P. Smith, Jefferson City, Mo. 

William Stuart, . Bolton, Miss. 

David A. Sumner, Salisbury, N. C. 

Daniel Williams, Baltimore, Md. 

John T. Wright, Lincoln University, Pa. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Julius C. Anderson, Philadelphia, Pa. 

William T. Barrett, Danville, Va. 

Edward A. Brown, Raleigh, N. C. 

William H. Bushrod, Lincoln University, Pa. 

Charles H. Bynum, Toisnot, N. C. 

Daniel Bythewood, Beaufort, S. C. 

James A. Creditt, Baltimore, Md. 

James L. Curtis, Raleigh, N. C. 

Benjamin F. Davis, Ludlow, Ky. 

John W. Derry, Baltimore, Md. 

Lylburn L. Downing, Lexington, Va. 

Leonard E. Fairley, Shoe Heel, N. C. 

Lawrence Findlayson, Goldsboro, N. C. 

Frisby Gibson, Eastern Shore, Md. 

Joseph W. Gill, Forestville, N. C. 

John H. Howard, York, Pa. 

Enoch W. Hubert, Wilmington, Del. 

Thornley O. James, Baltimore, Md. 

Thomas A. Johnson, Washington, D. C. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 13 



John H. Locklieb, Raleigh, N. C. 

Thomas A. Long, Franklinton, N. C. 

Richard E. Moore, Salem, N. J. 

"William J. Rankin, Elmwood, N. C. 

Cicero R. Robbins, New Berne, N. C. 

Nathaniel L. Smith, Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Charles S. Spriggs, Baltimore, Md. 

William S. Tildon, Michaelsville, N. C. 

Charles H. Trusty, Cold Spring, N. J. 

Joseph Williams, Raleigh, N. C. 

Oscar A. Williams, Raleigh, N. C. 

Emory B. Willis, Philadelphia, Pa. 

William Wolfe, Morristown, Tenn. 



SUMMARY. 

Senior Class, 46 

Junior Class, 29 

Sophomore Class, 28 

Freshman Class, 31 

Total in Collegiate Department, 134 



14 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



CALENDAR FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 1886-87. 

Recess, . April 8 to 15, 1886. 

Senior Final Examinations, April 26 to May 3, 1886. 

Class Day, May 6, 1886. 

Annual Examinations, . . May 24 to May 29, 1886. 

Baccalaureate Sermon, May 30, 1886. 

Junior Orations, May 31, 1886. 

Commencement Exercises, June 1, 1886. 

SUMMER VACATION. 

The Academical Year for 1886-87 will open September 16, 1886. 
Close of First Session, Dec. 23, 1886. 

WINTER VACATION. 

Second Session, January 6, 1887. 

REGULATIONS. 

The course of study in the Collegiate Department occupies four 
years. 

Applicants for the Freshman Class must be at least fifteen years of 
age. They will be examined in Spelling, English Grammar, Composi- 
tion of simple sentences, Geography, History of the United States. 

Arithmetic, Mental and Written. 

Latin Grammar, and Lessons. 

Greek Grammar, and Lessons. 

Candidates for advanced standing will be examined in the studies 
previously pursued by the class which they propose to enter. 

The Academical year is divided into two sessions. At the end of 
each session public examinations of all the classes are held. Absence 
from an examination, except for sufficient reason, sustained by vote of 
the Faculty, will be regarded as a serious delinquency, and cannot be 
made good by any subsequent examination. No student can be con- 
tinued in full standing in his class who does not pass all these exami- 
nations. Students are required to return promptly at the beginning of 
each session. 

At the close of each year all the classes are examined, either orally 
or in writing, in the studies of that year. 

The final examination of the Sophomore class includes the studies 
of the Freshman year as well as those of the current year. Members 
of the Sophomore class found deficient in general scholarship at this 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 15 



examination will not be advanced to the Junior class in full standing, 
and will not be entitled to the degree of A. B. at the close of the course. 

The rank of a student in his class depends on his grade in his 
recitations and examinations; on his punctuality and constancy in 
attendance upon all exercises of instruction ; and on his deportment in 
all his relations as a student. 

At the close of the Senior year the members of the Senior class are 
examined in the studies of the whole course. 

In determining the final rank of a Senior his grade in the final 
Senior examination is combined with the final grades of the previous 
collegiate years. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

The Annual Commencement will take place on Tuesday, the first 
day of June, 1886. 

The Baccalaureate sermon is addressed to the graduating class on 
the Sabbath preceding Commencement. 

On Commencement day the members of the Senior class, to whom 
orations are assigned, speak in the order of their rank; except that the 
valedictorian, who is chosen from the highest third of the class arranged 
according to the rank of the members, delivers the closing address. 

Special honorary orations are assigned, at the discretion of the 
Faculty, to members of the Senior class who may have excelled in 
particular branches of study. 

Students who complete the whole course of collegiate study satis- 
factorily to the Faculty and Board of Trustees, will receive the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. 

All degrees authorized by the Board of Trustees are announced 
by the Secretary of the Board and conferred by the President of the 
University, during the progress of the Commencement exercises. 

The collegiate year closes with the exercises on Commencement day, 
and is followed by the summer vacation. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

FIRST SESSION. SECOND SESSION. 

Review of Syntax. Parsing. Analysis. Elements of Rhetoric. 

Algebra. Algebra. 

Leighton's Greek Lessons. Caesar (Gallic War.) 

Goodwin's Greek Grammar. Leighton's Greek Lessons, con- 

Leighton's Latin Lessons. tinued. 

Allen & Grenough's Latin Grammar. Bible. Leviticus, Numbers, Deu- 

Bible. Genesis and Exodus. " teronomy. 



16 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 


SOPHOMORE CLASS. 


FIRST SESSION. 


SECOND SESSION. 


Principles of Philology. 


Principles of Philology. 


Critical Study of English Classics. 


English Classics. 


History. 


Geometry. 


Algebra. 


Natural Philosophy. 


Physical Geography. 


Physical Geography. 


Sallust. 


Cicero. 


Xenophon, (Anabasis). 


Anabasis, continued. 


Bible. Joshua, Judges, I. Samuel. 


Bible. II. Sam., I. & II. Kings. 


JUNIOR 


CLASS. 


FIRST SESSION. 


SECOND SESSION. 


Rhetoric and Philology. 


Rhetoric and Philology. 


English Classics. 


English Classics. 


Logic. 


Logic. 


Geometry. 


Astronomy. 


Chemistry. 


Trigonometry. 


Virgil. 


Chemistry. 


Arnold's Latin Prose Composit'n 


Tacitus. 


Homer, (Odyssey). 


Arnold's Latin Prose Composit'n 


Bible — Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther. 


Homer, Continued. 




Bible — Prophecies. 


SENIOR 


CLASS. 


FIRST SESSION. 


SECOND SESSION. 


History of English Literature. 


History of English Literature. 


Essay and Reviews. 


Essays and Reviews. 


Butler's Analogy. 


Paley's Natural Theology. 


Psychology. 


Moral Philosophy. 


Greek Testament. 


Greek Testament. 


Horace. 


Horace. 


Mathematics. 


Evidences of Christianity. 


Science and Revealed Religion. 


Social Science. 


Astronomy. 


Geology. 


Bible— The Life of Christ. 


Bible — The History in the Acts. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 17 



English Language and Literature. 

The student on entering the Freshman class must be well acquainted 
with the essentials 01* English Grammar. The first half of the Fresh- 
man year is devoted to review of syntax and exercises in parsing and 
analysis of sentences. The elements of rhetoric are then taught, and, 
at the end of the Freshman year, the student must be able to write 
English correctly and in good literary style. 

The principles of philology are taught at the beginning of the 
Sophomore year and made familiar by the critical study of English 
classics. Bunyan, Milton and Shakespeare are taken as representative 
English authors, and their works are studied with the care usually 
bestowed on the Latin and Greek classics. This study of English 
classics extends over the whole of the Sophomore and Junior years, 
and is kept in close connection with a thorough course in rhetoric and 
philology. 

During the Senior year the history of English literature is studied 
by text book and direct acquaintance with the standard literature of 
all ages. During the whole course, essays, reviews and criticisms are 
required very frequently. 



ENGLISH COURSE. 

Students not intending to take the full Classical Course are per- 
mitted to take a selection of studies in the English branches, including 
Natural Science. The English Course occupies two years and consists 
of the English studies of the Freshman and Sophomore Years, com- 
bined in one year, called the Freshman Year ; and the English studies 
of the Junior and Senior Years, combined in one year, called the 
Senior Year. This is not an elementary, but an advanced course, in 
the subjects included in it. The students in the English Course recite 
with the regular collegiate classes. They must be able to appreciate 
the higher topics in Rhetoric, Philosophy and Mathematics. All 
faithful students will receive a certificate of their success in their 
studies. 



18 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



FRESHMAN YEAR, 

Syntax, Parsing. History. 

Analysis of Sentences. Physical Geography 

Elements of Rhetoric. Algebra. 

Principles of Philology. Geometry. 

Critical Study of English Classics. Physics. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Rhetoric and Philology. Natural Theology. 

English Classics. Logic. 

Social Science. Psychology. 

Evidences of Christianity. Chemistry. 

Science and Revealed Religion. Astronomy. 



HONORS FOR THE YEAR 1885-86. 

The Junior contest took place in Livingston Hall, on Wednesday, 
the 3d of June, 1885. The contestants appointed by the Faculty and 
their subjects, were as follows: 

John M. Waldron, Virginia. 

Christian Education the Hope of the Republic. 

Daniel G. Hill, Maryland. 

Some Effects of Influence. 

Harry S. Cummings, Maryland. 

The Effect of Literature on Society. 

Armistead J. Gray, Virginia. 

Power of Public Opinion. 

Irving W. L. Roundtree, Florida. 

The Deluge. 

Albert L. Sumner, North Carolina. 

Common Sense. 

The first prize, a gold medal, marked A, was awarded to Armistead 
J. Gray. 

The second prize, a gold medal, marked B, was awarded to John 
M. Waldron. 

The Bradley Medal, for scholarship in Physical Science, was 
awarded to Moses H. Jackson, of the Senior Class. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 19 


COMMENCEMENT APPOINTMENTS. 


CLASS OF 1885. 


Alonzo Church, .... Pa. . . 


. . . Latin Salutatory. 


Robert B. McRarey, . . N. C. . 


{ A Demand for Christian 
' ' ' \ Educators. 


Charles P. Lee, . . . . N. Y. . 


. . . Heroism of Luther. 


Augustus E. Torrence, . N. C. . 


. . . "Peace, be Still." 


Charles S. Mebane, . . N. C. . 


. . . Rhetorical Oration. 


Moses H. Jackson, . . . D. C. . 


. . . Valedictory Oration. 


The Degree of A. B., in Course 


, was conferred on the following 


members of the Senior Class. They 


are printed in the order of their 


rank : 




Alonzo Church, 


John A. Whitted, 


Moses H. Jackson, 


Omie W. Murray, 


Robert B. McRarey, 


Augustus E. Torrence, 


James A. Bonner, 


Ezekiel H. Vance, 


John W. J. T. Carroll, 


Charles S. Mebane, 


Andrew W. Becks, 


Cadd G. O'Kelley, 


William A. Creditt, 


Benjamin F. Wheeler, 


James A. Becks, 


George W. McAdoo, 


Daniel A. Robinson, 


Samuel L. Conwell, 


Charles P. Lee, 


Woodson T. Merchant, 


Charles B. Dusenburry, 


Junius C. Alston, 


Edward H. Hunter, 


Braswell R. Winstead, 


William B. F. Thompson, 


Charles A. Isbell, 


Joseph G. Thomas, 


Abraham E. White, 


Henry E. Earle, 


Charles S. Flanders, 


James P. Adams, 


Henry W. Scott. 


The following Students finished the English Course : 


William H 


. Long, 


Beecher Carter, 


Granville 


Hunt, 


Alexander 


McNeill, 


George A. 


Fisher. 



20 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



EXPENSES. 

FIRST SESSION. 

Tuition, $10 00 

Coal, 5 00 

Furniture, 2 50 

Library, 1 00 

Board and Washing, 31 50 

$50 00 

SECOND SESSION. 

Tuition, $15 00 

Coal, 8 00 

Furniture, 2 50 

Library, 1 00 

Board and Washing, 45 00 

$71 50 

Total for one year, $121 50 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

The Garnet Literary Association and the Philosophian Society 
meet every Friday evening. The literary exercises consist of speaking, 
composition and debate. All the members are required to take part 
in these exercises. The Societies are governed by laws adopted by 
themselves, and administered by officers chosen from their own mem- 
bers, under the general supervision of the Faculty of Arts. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 21 



preparatory Department, 



INSTRUCTORS. 

REV. ISAAC N. RENDALL, D. D., 

PRESIDENT. 

REV. JOHN B. RENDALL, A.M., 

PRINCIPAL. 

WILLIAM R. LAWTON, A.B., 

ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND ORTHOGRAPHY. 

JOHN A. BOYDEN, A.B., 

LATIN. 

THOMAS H. LEE, A.B., 

ARITHMETIC. 

JAMES H. SCOTT, A.B., 

GREEK. 

GEORGE E. STEPHENS, A.B., 

GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY. 



STUDENTS. 

Millard F. Allen, Philadelphia, Pa. 

James M. Boddy, Wrightsville, Pa. 

Samuel H. Brown, Raleigh, N. C. 

Charles S. Clark, Macon, Ga. 

James H. Duckrey, Summit Bridge, Del. 

Maximus F. Duty, Nassau, Bahama 

James H. Gant, Flushing, L. I., N. Y. 

Oscar Gillingham, Lincoln University, Pa. 

Alonzo S. Gray, Wadmelaw Island, S. C. 

Ebenezer A. Houston, Fleming, Ga. 

George H. Jeffers, Lincoln University, Pa. 

William H. Moore, Raleigh, N. C. 

William T. Moss, Baltimore, Md. 

David H. Porter, Chatham, Pa. 

Isaac N. Porter, Summit Bridge, Del. 

Albert R. Rideout, Baltimore, Md. 

January R. Rivers, St. Helena Island, S. C. 

John R. Robinson, St. Louis, Mo. 

John W. Schenck, Charlotte, N. C. 

Charles W. Steevens, Fleming, Ga. 

Frederick D. Tilden, Michaelsville, Md. 

Lawrence L. Townsend, Bennettsville, S. C. 

David West, Petersburg, Va. 



22 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



CALENDAR FOR THE YEAR 1886-87. 

Recess, April 8 to 15, 1886. 

Closing Exercises, May 31, 1886. 

Close of Current Year, June 1, 1886. 

Vacation. 

Only session of the thirty-first academical year 

begins, Jan. 6, 1887. 



REGULATIONS. 

The Preparatory Department is designed to prepare the students to 
enter upon the studies of the Freshman year. The study of Latin 
and Greek is commenced in the Preparatory year. No students will 
be admitted into the department in September, 1886. On the 6th of 
January, 1887, the department will be opened for the preparation of 
candidates for the Freshman class of the following year. No candi- 
dates will be admitted who are not at that time well prepared in 
English studies to enter the Freshman class. 



COURSE OF PREPARATORY STUDY. 

Bible. Geography. History. 

Spelling. Arithmetic. Latin Grammar and Lessons. 

Reading. Grammar. Greek Grammar and Lessons. 

Writing. 

EXPENSES. 

SESSION. 

Tuition, $15 00 

Coal, 8 00 

Furniture, 2 50 

Library, 1 00 

Board and Washing, 45 00 

$71 50 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



23 



Theological Department 



FACULTY OF THEOLOGY. 

Rev. ISAAC N. RENDALL, D. D., President. 
Rev. GILBERT T. WOODHULL, D. D., 

Avery Professor of Greek and New Testament Literature. 

Rev. THOMAS W. CATTELL, Ph. D., 

Professor of Sacred Geography and Antiquities. 

Rev. BENJAMIN T. JONES, 

Professor of Instruction in the English Version of the Bible. 

Rev. E. T. JEFFERS, D. D., 

Baldwin Professor of Theology. 

Rev. DAVID E. SHAW, A. M., 

Professor of Hebrew and Church History. 

Rev. SAMUEL A. MARTIN, A. M., 

William E. Dodge Professor of Sacred Rhetoric. 

Rev. JOHN B. RENDALL, A. M., 

Instructor in Ecclesiastical Latin. 



STUDENTS. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Tilghman Brown, Centreville, Md. 

Edward F. Eggleston, Oxford, Pa. 

Charles J. Lawton, St. Louis, Mo. 

William R. Lawton, St. Louis, Mo. 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

William H. Banks, Fulton, Mo. 

John A. Boyden, Lexington, N. C. 

William H. Dover, . Philadelphia, Pa. 

Thomas H. Lee, Baltimore, Md. 

Isham B. Raney, Augusta, Ga. 

James H. Scott, Baltimore, Md. 

George E. Stevens, Philadelphia, Pa. 



24 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



JUNIOR CliASS. 

James A. Bouner, Goldsboro, N. C. 

Joseph A. Brown,* Kingston, Jamaica. 

Beecher Carter, Elizabethtown, Tenn. 

Alonzo Church, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

William A. Creditt, . . . , Baltimore, Md. 

Handy A. Cromartie, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Charles B. Dusenburry, Lexington, N. C. 

George A. Fisher Baltimore, Md. 

Granville Hunt, Raleigh, N. C. 

Moses H. Jackson, Washington, D. C. 

William H. Long, Franklinton, N. C. 

Alexander McNeill, Shoe Heel, N. C. 

Robt. B. McRarey, Lexington, N. C. 

Charles S. Mebane, Mebanesville, N. C. 

Cadd G. O'Kelley, Raleigh, N. C. 

Henry W. Scott, Greensboro, N. C. 

Augustus E. Torrence, Davidson College, N. C. 

Benjamin F. Wheeler, Charlotte, N. C. 

James W. Wilson, Cape Mount, Liberia. 

CALENDAR FOR 1886-87. 

Recess, April 8 to 15, 1886. 

Annual Sermon, April 18, 1886. 

Annual Examinations, April 19 to 20, 1886. 

Commencement, April 21, 1886. 

SUMMER VACATION. 

First Session of Academical Year 1886-87, . . September 16, 1886. 
Address to Theological Students by Rev. T. W. 

Cattell, Ph. D., September 16, 1886. 

Close of Session, December 23, 1886. 

WINTER VACATION. 

Opening of Second Session, Jan. 6, 1887. 

REGULATIONS. 

The course of study in the Theological Department occupies three 
years. 

Applicants for admission to the privileges of the Theological De- 
partment must present evidence of membership in good standing in 
some Evangelical church. 

Students who complete the full course of theological study to the 
satisfaction of the Faculty and the Board of Trustees will receive the 
degree of Bachelor of Sacred Theology. 

* Irregular. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 25 



No person not a graduate of the Collegiate Department of Lincoln 
University, or of some other collegiate institution, will be admitted to 
this department as a candidate for the degree of S. T. B., unless he pass 
a satisfactory examination. But applicants who have not pursued a 
course of classical training may, at the discretion of the Faculty, be 
admitted to particular classes, or to the English course of instruction. 
Such students, on leaving the University, will be entitled to certificates 
in evidence of their attendance on instruction, and of the time spent 
in study. 

The academical year is divided into two sessions. At the close of 
the second session the students are examined on the studies of the 
current year. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Homiletics. Pastoral Theology. 

New Testament Introduction. Hebrew. 

Bible History. Apologetics. 

Systematic Theology. Exegesis (Gospels). 
Sacred Geography. 

MIDDLE TEAR. 

Systematic Theology. Exegesis (Epistles). 

Biblical Antiquities. Ecclesiastical History. 

Homiletics. Church Government. 

Apologetics. Bible — The Different Forms of 
Hebrew. Sacred Literature. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Systematic Theology. Exegesis (Epistles). 

Homiletics. Pastoral Theology. 

Hebrew. Church Government. 

Ecclesiastical History. Bible — Prophecies. 

Throughout the course particular attention is paid to the prepara- 
tion and delivery of sermons. 

ENGLISH COURSE. 

FIRST YEAR. SECOND YEAR. 

Homiletics. Homiletics. 

Bible History. Biblical Antiquities. 

Systematic Theology. Systematic Theology. 

Sacred Geography. Pastoral Theology. 

Apologetics. Church Government. 

Ecclesiastical History. 



26 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



A New Chair of Instruction in Lincoln University. 

At a meeting of the Board of Trustees of Lincoln University it 
was unanimously resolved : 

I. That we hereby establish a Chair of Instruction in the Theo- 
logical Department to be called in the records of the University " The 
Chair of Instruction in the English Version of the Bible" and that 
among the duties of this Chair shall be : 

The giving of instruction in the subject of Versions of the Sacred 
Scriptures, including English Versions, and especially the Authorized 
Version. 

A course of instruction in the Historical Contents of the Old and 
New Testaments. 

A course of instruction in the different forms of Sacred Literature 
contained in the Several Books. 

A special Course of instruction in the Prophecies of the Bible. 

II. The design of the Board of Trustees in establishing this Chair 
is to secure that no student shall be graduated from the Theological 
Department of this institution without acquiring a thorough knowledge 
of the Bible in the English language. 

To this end the Board of Trustees enjoins it upon the Faculty of 
Theology to require the students under the direction of the incumbent 
of this Chair to read the whole Bible carefully and studiously, and to 
commit to memory such passages as may be assigned to them with this 
design. 

COURSE IN HEBREW. 

Junior Year. — Green's Grammar, Gen. I-III; Exercises in writing 
Hebrew; Forming Vocabularies. 

Middle Year. — Syntax, Gen. VI-X ; Ruth ; Jonah. 

Senior Year. — Messianic Psalms ; Minor Prophets. 

CHURCH HISTORY. 

Middle Year. — Text Books, Kurtz & Smith. Study the history of 
the Church from the Apostolic times until the 14th Century. 

Senior Year. — From the 14th Century down to the present time. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 27 



SACRED RHETORIC. 

The purpose of this department is two-fold : First, to form in the 
mind of the student a high and correct ideal of gospel preaching. To 
this end he is first made familiar with the theory of preaching, using 
Dr. Shedd's " Homiletics " as a text-book. He is then required to study 
the lives and work of some of the great preachers of ancient and 
modern times, and to write reviews of the same. In connection with 
this work he is made acquainted with the standard hymns of the 
Church, .with their history and authorship. 

Second ; to cultivate the best means of reaching this ideal. The student 
is trained to write in a clear and simple style. He is next required to 
analyse texts assigned to him, and to construct skeletons of sermons. 
At the beginning of the second year, some book of the New Testament 
is selected, the whole book analyzed, and a number of sermons written 
during the year covering the whole contents of the book. In assigning 
these subjects, care is taken to give opportunity for exercise in exposi- 
tory sermonizing, as well as topical and textual. 

During the Senior year, the students are required to preach with- 
out manuscript. 

COMMENCEMENT. 

On the day of Commencement the candidates for the degree of S* 
T. B. deliver addresses, at the discretion of the Faculty of Theology. 
Students not taking this degree may also be appointed to deliver 
addresses on Commencement day. After the exercises of public 
speaking, the President of the University will confer the degrees which 
have been authorized by the Board of Trustees. 

The Annual Sermon for the year 1886 was preached by the 
Rev. W. P. Breed, D.D., on the 18th day of April. 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES, 1886. 

The Commencement took place in Livingstone Hall on the 21st 
day of April, at 12 o'clock M. 

ADDRESSES BY THE CLASS OF 1886. 

Tilghman Brown, Maryland. 

Negro Evangelization. 

Edward F. Eggleston, Virginia. 

Revivals of Religion among the Freedmen. 

Charles J. Lawton, Missouri. 

Educated Colored Ministers for the West. 

William R. Lawton, Missouri. 

How can they Preach except they be Sent? 



28 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



The degree of S. T. B. was conferred on the members of the 
graduating class ; and of D. D. on the Kev. Joseph S. Thompson, of 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

THE ENGLISH COURSE. 

In the year 1876 the Board of Trustees of Lincoln University 
addressed the following memorial and overture to the General Assem- 
bly of the Presbyterian Church : 

"The Board of Trustees of Lincoln University, deeply interested 
in the condition of the Freedmen, and convinced that their continued 
destitution of an authorized educated ministry is a reproach to the 
Church and a source of danger to the country, respectfully urge the 
General Assembly to devise and adopt some practical plan to supply 
this want ; and overture the Assembly to consider and act upon the 
following propositions : 

"First. — Resolved, That this Assembly recognize it as the impera- 
tive duty of the Church to send the Gospel to the Freedmen without 
delay. 

"Second. — That while in the considerate judgment of this Assembly 
the regulations embodied in the fourteenth chapter of the Form of 
Government respecting the trial of candidates for licensure are an 
authoritative guide to Presbyteries in determining their qualifications, 
they do not supersede the discretion of the Presbyteries in the responsi- 
bility of committing the ministry of the word to faithful men. 

"Third. — That all Presbyteries providentially brought into rela. 
tions with the Freedmen be hereby advised to license all colored men 
of whose call to preach the gospel they may be satisfied, and whose 
training and abilities they may deem sufficient to qualify them for this 
sacred work. 

"Fourth. — That the Board of Education be instructed to assume 
in behalf of the Church the pecuniary responsibility of educating in 
a thorough course of Theological studies in the English language all 
colored candidates for the ministry recommended to their care by the 
Presbyteries." 

To this memorial and overture the Assembly returned the following 
answer : 

"First. — The Assembly has no authority to modify the regulations 
of our form of government in respect to qualifications of licentiates, so 
as to make provision for any class of exceptional cases. At the same 
time the Assembly recognizes the propriety of the exercise, by Pres- 
byteries, of a wise discretion in their administration of the functions 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



29 



intrusted to them by the Church, in view of the great work to be 
done by our Church among the colored people in this country. The 
Assembly specially accords such discretion to those Presbyteries which 
are providentially brought into special relations to that work ; mean- 
while, in view of the experience of several years, enjoining upon such 
Presbyteries the obligation to take great care lest incompetent or 
unworthy men be admitted into the ministry of our Church. 

"Second. — This general assembly does not deem it wise to modify 
the existing rules governing the Board of ^Education in the aiding of 
candidates for the ministry in our Church. The Assembly, however, 
earnestly commends the exceptional cases, referred to in the overture, 
to the sympathy and charity of the Churches, and trust that the friends 
of our work among the Freedmen will suffer no worthy young man, 
devoting himself to that work, to fail for lack of pecuniary aid." — 
Minutes of the General Assembly, 1876. 

This answer of the General Assembly virtually affirms the first 
proposition, that it is the duty of the Church to send the Gospel to the 
Freedmen without delay. The assembly specially accords to particular 
Presbyteries discretion in licensing, as preachers of the Gospel, candi- 
dates who have been exercised in a thorough course of Theological 
studies in the English language, according to the second and third 
propositions. And although the Assembly did not instruct the Board 
of Education to adopt a wider policy in supporting colored candidates 
for the ministry, its past policy, which has been liberal, was not 
restricted. The education of colored men in a thorough course of 
Theological studies in the English language was commended by the 
Assembly to the sympathies and charity of the Churches and friends 
of our work among the Freedmen. 

The English course in the Theological Department occupies two 
years. It embraces the same studies as the full course with the excep- 
tion of the Greek and Hebrew Scriptures. 

ECCLESIASTICAL RELATIONS. 



By the charter of Lincoln University the Theological Department 
is placed under the care of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church, in conformity with the general plan adopted for the supervision 
of Theological Seminaries. The General Assembly, which met in 
Chicago in May, 1871, accepted the oversight of the Theological 
Department of Lincoln University, as provided in the charter, and 
approved the appointments and proceedings of the Board of Trustees, 
as reported at that time. The laws of Lincoln University require that 



30 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



any action of the Board of Trustees affecting the Theological Depart- 
ment shall be reported to the General Assembly by the Secretary of 
the Board. The Faculty of Theology is also required to prepare for 
the information of the General Assembly an annual report of their 
work in instruction, and of all matters of interest respecting the 
Theological Department. 



EXPENSES. 



FIRST SESSION. 



Coal, $ 5 00 

Furniture, 2 50 

Board and Washing, 31 50 

$39 00 

SECOND SESSION. 

Coal, $ 8 00 

Furniture, 2 50 

Board and Washing, 31 50 

42 00 

Total for one year, $81 00 



Theological and Missionary Societies. 

The Theological and Missionary Society meets every Friday even- 
ing for exercises connected with Ministerial and Missionary work. 
The room occupied by the Society is supplied with a library of general 
and special commentaries, and furnished with religious and missionary 
periodicals. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 31 



General Statement, 



Lincoln University is in Chester county, Pennsylvania, half a 
mile from Lincoln University station, on the Philadelphia and Balti- 
more Central railroad. That part of Chester county in which the 
University is situated, is notably free from malarial and pulmonary 
diseases. The Institution is well removed from associations which tend 
to prevent high literary attainments and hinder the formation of a high 
moral character. The post-office, where the Professors should be 
addressed, is LINCOLN UNIVERSITY, 

Chester County, Pa. 

The corporate title of this Institution, is " The Lincoln Univer- 
sity." Bequests intended to promote the work of this University will 
be legally valid under that title. 

The first charter of this Institution was granted by the State of 
Pennsylvania, under the title of " Ashmun Institute," in 1854. In 
1866, the title was changed by amendment of the charter to " The 
Lincoln University." The Theological Department was by another 
change of the charter in 1871, placed under the control of the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church. 

The property of Lincoln University consists of land, buildings 
and endowments. 

LAND. 

Seventy-five acres in Lower Oxford, Pa. 

BUILDINGS. 

Ashmun Hall contains dormitories for forty-eight students; a 
recitation room for the preparatory students ; and rooms for a board- 
ing club. 

Lincoln Hall contains dormitories for fifty-six students; the 
society halls, and the Janitor's apartments. 

Cresson Hall contains dormitories for seventy students ; the 
library and reading-room, and the chemical laboratory. 



32 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



University Hall contains the chapel and six recitation rooms. 
This Hall is one wing of a building, which, when finished, will supply 
accommodations for the whole work of instruction. 

Houston Hall contains dormitories and study-rooms for thirty- 
five students, and the room for the Theological and Missionary Society. 

Livingstone Hall is for commencement assemblies, and will 
seat one thousand persons. 

There are six comfortable residences for the Professors. 

ENDOWED PROFESSORSHIPS. 

The Mary Warder Dickey Presidency. 

The Avery Professorship of Lincoln University. 

The John C. Baldwin Professorship of Theology. 

The William E. Dodge Professorship of Sacred Rhetoric. 

The John H. Cassedy Professorship of Latin. 

The Reuben J. Flick Professorship. 

The Professorship of Natural Science. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Dr. Barker Scholarship. 

The Bradley Scholarship. 

The Lemuel Brooks Scholarship. 

The Bush Scholarship. 

The Richard Clapp Scholarship, No. 1. 

The Richard Clapp Scholarship, No. 2. 

The William E. Dodge Scholarships. 

The John Dunlap Scholarship. 

The Charles Jessup Scholarship. 

The Henry A. Kerr Scholarship. 

The Dr. Josiah Kittridge Scholarship. 

Tne John Nelson Scholarship. 

The One Blood Scholarship. 

The Phelps Scholarship. 

The Nancy Milliken Reed Scholarship. 

The Scholarship Fund. 

The Watson Scholarship. 

The Westfield Scholarship. 

The Whitlock Scholarship. 

Since the issue of the last Catalogue, through the generous favor of 
Rev. William A. Holliday, D.D., fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000,) 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 33 



have been offered to the Trustees of Lincoln University to complete 
the endowment of the Chair of Natural Science. The Trustees have 
taken measures to fill this chair by the selecting of a man of high 
scientific attainments, and also of a devout Christian spirit, who, in 
teaching the truths of nature, will not discredit the more important 
truths of revelation. 

Action of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church, May 1885. 

Resolved, "That in accordance with what is understood to be the 
desire of Members of the Board of Missions for Freedmen, and the 
Board of Trustees of Lincoln University, it be recommended that these 
two Boards confer together, with the view to some closer co-operation 
in their common work in behalf of the colored race." Minutes 1885, 
Page 648. 

Action of the Board of Trustees of Lincoln Uni- 
versity, Jnne 3d, 1885. 

On motion it was ordered that in accordance with the recom- 
mendation of the General Assembly a Committee of six members of 
this Board, be appointed to confer with a similar Committee of the 
Board of Missions for Freedmen in regard to a closer co-operation in 
their common work in behalf of the Freedmen. 

The Committee appointed in accordance with the above action 
consisted of Rev. W. R. Bingham, D. D., Rev. Thomas McCauley, 
Rev. I. N. Kendall, D. D., Charles E. Vail, Esq., Rev. Calvin W. 
Stewart, D. D. 

A conference was held with the Board of Missions for Freedmen 
on Tuesday, the 7th day of July, which developed several points of 
agreement. The Board of Missions for Freedmen expressed — 

1. Their gratification with the interview. 

2. Their desire that the plan approved should be carried into 
effect as soon as possible. 

3. Their readiness to enter upon this plan of co-operation by the 
payment of salaries, beginning in September, 1885. 

4. The individual members of the Board of Missions for Freedmen, 
then present, Rev. Dr. Elliot E. Swift, President of the Board ; Rev. 



34 LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 



Richard H. Allen, Secretary of the Board ; Rev. Dr. James Allison, 
Treasurer of the Board ; Rev. Samuel J. Fisher, and Messrs. John C. 
McCombs and Robert S. Davis, expressed their approval of this plan, 
and their intention to advocate it before their Board. 



Action of the Board of Missions for Freedmen. 

According to the recommendation of the General Assembly, the 
Board of Missions for Freedmen, after considering carefully the 
paper presented to it by the Board of Trustees of Lincoln University, 
amended and adopted said paper, and most respectfully proposed it 
as amended, to said Trustees of Lincoln University, "as a basis and 
method of co-operation in our common work for the education of the 
Freedmen." 

I. The Board of Missions for Freedmen having examined the 
organization and methods of Lincoln University, and having know- 
ledge of its resources for the training of Theological students hereby 
expresses its approval of the said institution and agrees to adopt it as 
a suitable agency for Theological Education. 

II. The Board of Missions for Freedmen hereby agrees with the 
Board of Trustees of Lincoln University to co-operate with them in 
their Theological work by paying annually, in quarterly installments, 
the salary of one Professor in Lincoln University. 

The two Boards not being able to agree upon a plan, proposed to 
bring the co-operation to an end at the option of either party; nor 
upon some proposed instructions to the financial representatives of 
Lincoln University, the negotiations were discontinued. 

The whole work of Lincoln University needs immediate enlarge- 
ment. A small comparative addition to her funds would greatly 
increase her power for usefulness. The attention of considerate friends 
is invited to the following special wants : 

The endowment of the chair of Hebrew in the Theological De- 
partment. 

The establishment of a chair of Church History and of General 
History. 

The establishment of a chair of Mental and Moral Science. 

The erection of an additional wing to University Hall, to provide 
rooms for the instruction of the classes. 

The erection of a chapel for the Sabbath and daily devotional 
services. 



LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. 35 



The erection of three residences for Professors. 

The provision by endowment for the care and improvement of the 
property of the University. 

The endowment of Scholarships for the perpetual education of 
worthy young men whose diligence, talents and piety give promise of 
usefulness. 

The erection of another dormitory for the increase of students in 
the Theological Department. 

Adequate provision for the preservation, enlargement and use of 
the Library. 

Among the instrumentalities through which the friends of the 
Negro may convey to him the blessings of education, Lincoln Uni- 
versity especially deserves the confidence of the Christian public. She 
was the first to enter this field, when there was no other to undertake 
the work. Lincoln University was chartered in 1854. She is still 
doing a large share of the higher work. Worthy applicants are 
knocking at our doors, eager for the benefits here afforded. Who will 
say to us, "Turn no worthy man away who desires an education for 
the sake of the good he can do with it ? " 

Five hundred young men have been sent out from the Preparatory 
Department and from the lower classes of the Collegiate Department 
many of whom are engaged in important positions as teachers in the 
Southern States. 

Two hundred and sixty-six have been graduated from the Collegiate 
Department, after a course of instruction extending through four and 
in many cases six years. Most of these graduates are engaged in pro- 
fessional and educational labors in the Southern States. 

More than one hundred of the students of Lincoln University have 
received ordination as ministers in the several Evangelical Protestant 
denominations. 

Ten of our students have gone to Africa as missionaries of the cross. 
Six have laid down their lives in that work. Six are now laboring 
there as teachers, and ministers. 

The University is consecrated to the glory of God and the good of 
man. It has received the endorsement of all who are acquainted with 
its work. The friends of the education of "colored youth" are 
cordially invited to investigate its plans and operations, and to co- 
operate with its officers in conferring the benefits of a liberal and 
Christian culture on those who prize and so much need this blessing. 



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